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Today was a glorious day in Astoria, we left Blandford this morning at a slightly chilly 50 degrees and arrived to 70 degrees and vibrant sunshine. It was a delight to see most off the trees sprouting buds and flowers and to see daffodils standing proudly tall and regal along with their partners, the hyacinths. I am quite proud of the two shots that I took of the immense magnolia tree right before Astoria Park; the magnolia cups are, I think, the most spectacular sign of spring; stunning in its glory and so delicate in its fleeting life cycle.

I included pictures of my mother’s front yard with her daffodils, hyacinths nestled around the dogwood tree that we gave her years ago and planted for her. What I like about my mother’s garden is that she has two levels, making for a dynamic visual, especially in pictures.

Jack felt the excitement of spring today; he hurried to the park and eagerly romped and scamped through the mounds of dead leaves trying to elicit some response from the plump squirrels sitting comfortably above his head, chewing on nuts.

I am lucky, I get to experience spring for a long time, my spring in Blandford won’t express its beauty until much later, mid May, I think from the look of the upcoming weather forecast. I’m fine with that because having spring twice is never a bad thing, nature’s rebirth is always welcome no matter how many times you may witness it.